Why You Should Write Down Team Objectives


Great leaders reach their annual goals, meet or surpass quarterly objectives and insist on hitting weekly metrics.

Teams that show up and work hard will achieve a lot.  Teams that strive for specific objectives (outcomes) achieve more.

Yet, when I ask managers and employees to list the top three objectives for their teams, surprises bubble up.  I combine the individual lists and the result looks like a hundred-car pile-up.  Items fight with each other, general (often meaningless) statements emerge from the deep, and important outcomes disappear into the mist.  Literally no one agrees on the priorities.

Confusion abounds in spite of the fact that companies have systems for identifying, communicating and tracking objectives.

If you want to send a bat signal to your team, write down three objectives you want the team to achieve by quarter end.  List three measurable targets for each objective.  Communicate this list to your boss and employees.  Monthly, attach a symbol (green, yellow, red) to each objective to signal how the team is doing.  Discuss progress, or lack of, briefly in regular meetings.

To galvanize a team, members most know what defines success and they must receive timely feedback (scores) on how well, or poorly, they are doing.

Short-Term Versus Long-Term Goals?


A manager said, “I take the long view.  We drive toward goals three to five years in the future.  Annually, we adjust and revise as needed.”

Another manager responded, “I have a general idea of a long-term vision, but I try to avoid getting ahead of my skis.  I pick the three to five most important things we need to accomplish next quarter.”

Personally, I side with the short-term view.  I understand that top-level leaders may dream of exotic future visions.  I’m also aware that most of these visions do not materialize.  And many dramatic developments (internet) were neither predicted nor planned for.

I say apply the effort toward reaching three-month goals such as:  shipping on time, ensuring supplies arrive, improving customer service, controlling costs, and the like.  Each department should have no more than three to five targets.

It is important to track daily, weekly and monthly progress with easy-to-understand metrics.  If the needle falls south of a metric target, the team can quickly adjust.

At the end of the quarter, all members know the score.  Leaders should also have clear insights about which goals to continue, add or drop.