Use Nudges to Influence Reluctant Responders


“I want to tell you a success story.  I became frustrated with an employee in another department.  I had to complete a monthly report which required information from the employee.  Often, the information was late or incomplete—frequently, both.”

“What did you do?”

“I talked with my boss, the employee, and the employee’s boss.  (I also complained to my spouse, in-laws and kids.)  All were supportive and the employee agreed to do better and did—but improvement was short-lived.”

“OK, what did you do next?”

“I heard a lecture on the value of professional nagging.  So I began sending the employee frequent, reminder texts and voice messages. Occasionally, I just dropped by to visit.  I was always pleasant and offered to help.  The employee has become much more responsive, and I think we actually get along better.”

Professors Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, in their book NUDGE, describe how we can influence others’ behavior by gently reminding them of choices.  Managers at Google use nudges to help their employees eat healthier foods, invest better and improve teamwork.

Nudges are not shoves.  They are not demands.  Nudges high-light choices and may take the form of texts, posters, emails, signs, voice mails, drop-ins, seat-belt dinging and other forms of professional nagging.

 

Should You Practice Power Poses?


Two employees chat during their lunch break.

“Did you meet the new boss?”

“Yes.”

“What did you think?”

“I’ve heard that she is smart, but she has a limp handshake and doesn’t look you in the eye.  I’m not sure she’s cut out for the job.”

We’ve known for some time that your body language contributes significantly to the images that others have of you.  The Wonder Woman stance–hands on hips, shoulders back, legs slightly spread–communicates confidence and power.

Researcher Amy Cuddy and others suggest that you can actually increase your self-confidence and power by practicing power poses.

Cuddy asked subjects to sit for a couple of minutes in high-power poses—hands behind the head, leaning back, feet on a desk.  Another group sat in low-power poses—bent forward, looking downward, hands folded.

Later, those who practiced high-power poses scored higher in simulated job interviews.  Interviewers saw them as more confident, authentic and comfortable.

Cuddy and associates suggest that your body positions actually change the chemistry in your brain.  For example, high-power posers’ testosterone levels increased and cortisol levels decreased.  This resulted in the ability to be comfortably assertive.

Tiny tweaks in your body posture may actually result in big changes in your ability to persuade and influence others.

 

 

If You Chase Two Rabbits, You Will Not Catch Either One


After a manager presented the departments’ ten objectives for the upcoming quarter, a supervisor asked, “Which are the most important?”

“All are important,” the manager replied.  “We have to achieve all of them.”

Another employee said, “Sometimes, we get surprises and it may not be possible to achieve everything.”

“Yes,” added another, “and some are in conflict.  When there is a quality issue, do I fix the glitch and miss the on-time; or do I ship on-time, knowing the product may be returned?”

The manager stated, “I expect you to make every effort to achieve all of the objectives.”

The manager’s comment shut down the discussion but did not address the issue.  No one believes all of the objectives are equally important.  To paraphrase a quote from George Orwell’s novel, ANIMAL FARM, “All of the objectives of the department are equal but some of the objectives are more equal than others.”

For an agricultural promotion, a state representative said, “We are Number One in egg production but not Number One in chicken production.  You can’t be Number One in both of those.”

We achieve great things by laser-firing our efforts toward being good at one thing at the time.  “If you chase two rabbits, you will not catch either one,” states an old proverb.

How to Motivate Employees with Pseudo-Set Framing


“Things occur in three’s and seven’s.”  This phrase rings in my ears when I train my pup to point and hold birds.  I first heard the phrase while attending famed-trainer, Delmar Smith’s workshop for amateur dog trainers.

Successful dog training requires mind-numbing, repetitive activities.  To stay focused, I set targets of completing three sets of seven’s; sometimes I vary it to seven sets of three’s.

Many years later, I read in the “Journal of Experimental Psychology” that researchers Kate Barasz and others report that people have an irrational need to complete “sets” of things. Their experiments show that pseudo-set framing (describing things as groups) significantly improves results.

Rather than asking employees to perform the same task hundreds of time during a work day, consider breaking the tasks into groups of ten’s or twenty’s.

You seek a twelve percent improvement in some performance metric; break the request into four phases with each phase representing three percent.  If your team is in tenth place, challenge them to improve three places.  Then ask for three more.

How do you eat the whole elephant?  Take three bites at the time.  Think “sweet sixteen,” “six pack,” “two for the price of one,” “top ten,” “one dozen,” “five, ten, fifteen . . .”